The Dangers of Cycling

  October 23, 2015




Over 2 million people in Britain are now cycling at least once a week, with over half a million of those being women.

It’s a great way to keep fit, keep commuting costs down and have fun. I am more aware of the weather when cycling and it is really true that a morning cycle doesn’t mean getting wet every day.

When I am a pedestrian walking along tow paths or beside cycle lanes, I am amazed at the speed some cyclists reach on their bikes. I’m not a speed merchant when I ride so have been impressed by those who can cycle as fast as a car!

I was not so impressed however, when I was almost knocked off my feet by a speeding cyclist on a narrow section of my morning towpath walk. The brush was so close that we both stopped and exchanged a few heated words. The cyclist maintained he had rung his bell. I maintained that I hadn’t heard it.

So what, I asked, would have happened if I had been deaf and couldn’t hear behind me?

It must surely be the cyclist’s responsibility to be aware that not everyone can hear behind them. Even the most sophisticated of hearing aids are usually focused forwards.

So, a plea to all cycling proficiency schemes, cycling clubs and keen cyclists. Please be aware that not everyone can hear you coming whether you ring a bell or shout.

Give pedestrians space and we will all commute contentedly together.


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Director's Blog

An important part of my mission at The Tinnitus Clinic is to share our knowledge of tinnitus;  its causes, how to prevent it and what to do if you are suffering from the condition. This blog will go some way in achieving this aim.


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